International Delusions

"Men, it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one."


I have voted Liberal Democrat for 20 years but as the "Left" declines further and further into insanity and leaves me further and further to the "Right", I see no alternative but to vote for the BNP (or another right-of-centre party should one appear). Tired of seeing the ever increasing number of rabid, ludicrous, hate-filled, "left-wing" blogs, I thought I'd better participate. Now it seems this makes me a racist, fascist, Islamophobic, "Zio-Nazi" (!), crusading white supremacist! I'm such an enigma, even to myself.

Islamophobia - an entirely rational recognition of the threat posed by radical Islam.

Racist/Fascist/Islamophobe/Etc. - anyone who recognises said threat or attempts to resist the global jihad.

Wednesday, September 05, 2007

George Orwell: Notes on Nationalism, 1945

Written in 1945 it contains a couple of paragraphs which are startlingly evocative of todays "anti-war" idiots movement:

"Pacifism. The majority of pacifists either belong to obscure religious sects or are simply humanitarians who object to the taking of life and prefer not to follow their thoughts beyond that point. But there is a minority of intellectual pacifists whose real though unadmitted motive appears to be hatred of western democracy and admiration of totalitarianism. Pacifist propaganda usually boils down to saying that one side is as bad as the other, but if one looks closely at the writings of younger intellectual pacifists, one finds that they do not by any means express impartial disapproval but are directed almost entirely against Britain and the United States. Moreover they do not as a rule condemn violence as such, but only violence used in defence of western countries."

"Anglophobia. Within the intelligentsia, a derisive and mildly hostile attitude towards Britain is more or less compulsory, but it is an unfaked emotion in many cases. During the war it was manifested in the defeatism of the intelligentsia, which persisted long after it had become clear that the Axis powers could not win. Many people were undisguisedly pleased when Singapore fell or when the British were driven out of Greece, and there was a remarkable unwillingness to believe in good news, e.g. el Alamein, or the number of German planes shot down in the Battle of Britain. English left-wing intellectuals did not, of course, actually want the Germans or Japanese to win the war, but many of them could not help getting a certain kick out of seeing their own country humiliated, and wanted to feel that the final victory would be due to Russia, or perhaps America, and not to Britain. In foreign politics many intellectuals follow the principle that any faction backed by Britain must be in the wrong."

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